Visual Assist build 2358 is available!

New Year, New Build! Welcome to 2020 and 2358. This release was driven largely to fix an issue with our licensing server and some corruption that may have been experienced by Unity users, but why stop there?

  • NEW Added C++ modernization refactoring: Convert Unscoped Enum to Scoped Enum (execute on the enum definition). See the documentation.
  • NEW Goto Related now allows hopping between *_Implementation and *_Validate implementations in UE4.
  • FIX Goto from a method declaration will now list *_Validate as a target in UE4.
  • NEW Added option (on the Goto page of Visual Assist Options dialog) to prefer implementations when executing Goto (Alt+G) (execution on the implementation will continue to go to the declaration as before).

Take a look at the full list of features and bug fixes here. And of course be sure to update!

Getting Started with UE4 and Visual Assist

Whether you’re new to Visual Assist and UE4 or a seasoned vet, we thought you might appreciate a little more insight into what you can expect and how to get started. Thanks to our resident UE4 wizards for putting this together.

1. Install Visual Assist

  1. Exit all instances of Visual Studio.
  2. Run the .exe installer you downloaded.
  3. Select the IDE(s) you want to install to.

2. Open your game solution

Visual Assist will come alive after it finishes parsing.

3. Look around

Open the Extensions > VAssistX menu. You will use the menu primarily to open tool windows, review keyboard shortcuts, and access the options dialog.

Appreciate the understated UI to Visual Assist. There are just a few visible changes.

4. Change a few settings

If you like meaningful syntax coloring, open the options dialog for Visual Assist and apply coloring to more of the UI.

If you highlight the current line, choose a thin frame that doesn’t obscure your code.

Visual Assist can add important information to tooltips when hovering over a symbol, such as comments from base classes. This is very helpful in UE4, as base class comments are the documentation.

Visual Assist can analyze your code and suggest improvements. Enable Code Inspections to see blue underlines where code might be improved. Visual Assist can even modernize your code for you! We will show how later.

Then, open the options dialog to Visual Studio and eliminate the redundant navigation bar. The version in Visual Assist includes the functionality of the built-in one.

Disable built-in navigation bar

After making the changes, Visual Studio is ready to use.

5. Navigation in UE4

Search for and open files using Alt + Shift + O. Precede a search filter with a hyphen to exclude symbols (negative filtering).

Understand and navigate the inheritance hierarchies of UE4 by using Alt + Shift + G on a class name. The Alt + Shift + G shortcut works on many types of symbols, try using it on a virtual method.

Source files in UE4 can be thousands of lines long. Use Alt + M to search for and navigate to methods inside the current file.

Find references to a symbol using Alt + Shift + F. Visual Assist’s find references is fast and accurate inside huge solutions like UE4. Try cloning your results to save them by clicking the Clone Results button or using the right-click menu.

Hover over a virtual method to see comments from base classes. Base class comments often contain useful documentation.

6. Refactoring in UE4

Access refactoring tools using the keyboard shortcut Alt + Shift + Q, or by hovering over a symbol and clicking the tomato icon that appears. The contents of the Alt + Shift + Q menu depend on the symbol.

It is common in UE4 to override virtual methods, such as Tick or SetupPlayerInputComponent. Visual Assist can implement these methods for you. Click on your class name and then use Alt + Shift + Q.

The Implement Methods dialog is searchable, and you can implement more than one method at once.

Visual Assist will intelligently add a call to the Super class version of the method for you when appropriate.

You will see blue underlines below code which could be modernized. This is Code Inspection.

Visual Assist can refactor the code for you! Use Alt + Shift + Q on the underlined symbol.

If you need to change the return type, parameters, or the name of a method you can use Change Signature. Edit the method definition in the window. References and call-sites to the method will be updated, so you won’t miss anything.

7. Tips

There is a lot of special functionality built into Visual Assist for UE4, such as suggestions for U* macros. The more you can use Visual Assist, the more opportunities to make your life a little easier in UE4.

You may find the built in IntelliSense to be unusably slow, or that it often adds red underlines to correct code in UE4. IntelliSense can be disabled. Visual Assist provides all the intelligent tooling expected in a modern C++ development environment.

You can throttle the initial parse in the Performance tab of the Visual Assist options dialog. By default, the one-time parse uses all available resources to finish as fast as possible.

For more information or support check out our forum and documentation.

Some features mentioned above require the latest build, check here for updates.

Developer Showcase: Visual Assist in Action

If you follow our blog, you’ve seen the features that our team is putting in place and likely felt their impact in your development. Instead of hearing more of the same, we thought we would share thoughts from one of our users. Meet Distalsoft, two brothers, one who can’t stop gaming and one with ideas. We’re not sure which one wrote this post, but either way check them out when you want to hunt for treasure or lose it all attempting Brexit.

C++ with Visual Assist, Visual Studio and Unreal Engine

It’s inspiring that software like Microsoft’s Visual Studio IDE and Epic’s Unreal Engine have been “free” for so long now. It pains me to think about where indie developers would be without the forward thinking force of these larger companies and their seemingly never-ending generosity. Helping start-ups and the like to get their feet on the ground is something I will forever be grateful for.

Although the tools come close to it, it would be naive to think that they can fulfil the job of every requirement. I want to point out a few problems we were facing at Distalsoft when it came to developing in Visual Studio using Unreal Engine and the solution we ended up going with.

Unreal Engine at its core uses the C++ language. Visual Studio – being a Microsoft product – makes development in C# very enjoyable. On the other hand, development in C++ has been a point of frustration for many years. From VS 2010 to VS 2017, improvements have been made to the overall speed of compilation, Intellisense, file searching and the like, but it has taken until 2019 for them to really make a dent in the problem. I must say that VS 2019 has done an excellent job of addressing the aforementioned issues but the question still stands – could it be better?

A few years ago when I was using VS 2015, I’d had enough. I’d sometimes be waiting several minutes for Intellisense to bring back a list of methods or properties that belonged to an object. I’m pretty sure we’ve all done it – smashing the heck out of the ctrl+shift+space keys and cursing at the screen while waiting for the Intellisense to pop up. Or simple searches in the solution explorer that end up taking longer to resolve than simply finding the file yourself. Perhaps even trying to navigate to the definition of a method only to be waiting minutes for the document to load up. Something had to change. I went searching on the internet for a solution. It didn’t take long to stumble across a piece of software called Visual Assist by Whole Tomato. It had been recommended many times on various parts of the AnswerHub forum for Unreal Engine and StackOverflow. Due to it having a trial version, I downloaded a copy to give it a try.

The expression “night and day”, really doesn’t do the software justice but it’ll have to do for now. I was extremely relieved. Searching for files, definitions, even just including header files were now as you would expect from an IDE. The additional dialog menu that is available when right clicking on bits of code you want to perform actions against, has a variety of options that make you realise what was/is missing from the ootb VS. To be honest, I don’t use half of them, but it’s the baseline mechanics that just work so much better. And, to address my biggest issue – the speed of Intellisense – type-ahead now loaded within seconds and sometimes even instantly. What a relief!

Unreal Engine have improved their documentation, but unfortunately it’s still not quite there. I would always see people answer questions in AnswerHub with “Look through the Unreal Engine code, it’s open source”. I always assumed they were joking. Pressing F12 to go to method definitions without Visual Assist would take forever. Thanks to my new found friend Visual Assist, I finally had the ability to go find the answers to some of the most annoying questions. It’s hard to really communicate just how irritating it used to be. Seriously, Visual Assist has made me a happy C++ coder again.

I suppose the last thing to make note of is that Visual Assist is not currently free, but the trial is sufficient to make you realise just how much happier you can be when using it. I would be interested to see Visual Assist introduce a subscription based payment plan, but you can’t complain. They have done a stellar job at creating a brilliant tool.

So in conclusion, go check it out. See for yourself. You won’t be disappointed.

This blog was brought to you by Distalsoft. If you’d like for us to showcase what you’re building (better and faster) with Visual Assist contact us.

Visual Assist build 2353 is available

This release represents a turning point for our development team. We’ve made great strides in fixing bugs associated with Visual Studio 2019 and have focused our attention on the future. A major lift in this release was our move to Clang 9. Future releases will leverage Clang in new ways so stay tuned! But Build 2353 wasn’t all about groundwork, Code Inspection has some nifty new features:

+ Code Inspection checkers are now more configurable. Further customize when Visual Assist alerts you of potential improvements.

+ Code Inspection UI is now searchable, and exposes more advanced information.

+ Code Inspections can now be selectively disabled in sections of your code using comments. If you don’t want to change a section of code, you can choose to not be alerted of potential improvements without disabling checkers globally.

+ New UI allows fine grained control of the resources Visual Assist will use when parsing. Reduce the impact of the initial parse of a new solution, especially in extremely large solutions where parsing may take several minutes. (Unreal Engine developers take note.)

For the full list of features and bug fixes take a look at our release notes, or download the installer.

Build 2353 requires software maintenance through 2019.11.07